Louisville Public Defenders Have Unionized

Public defenders with the Louisville Metro Public Defender’s Office voted to unionize 32-5 earlier this year. Their story is a microcosm of a national phenomenon: the year 2022, the year of American labor. Public defenders represent indigent clients, those who cannot afford a lawyer and are constitutionally entitled to one when facing criminal proceedings. PublicContinue reading “Louisville Public Defenders Have Unionized”

Progressives Support the Universal Basic Income, and Conservatives Should Too

A theory propagated since the inception of modern democracy, the basic income is a centuries-old political idea that has, since Andrew Yang’s popular stance in the 2020 Democratic Presidential Primary, only been disseminated further. A universal basic income (UBI) is generally considered a liberal or leftist belief, economically speaking. Liberal proponents like Robert Reich andContinue reading Progressives Support the Universal Basic Income, and Conservatives Should Too

The Philosophical and Moral Implications of Felon Disenfranchisement

Great socio-political thinkers have sought to unravel the mystery of criminal disenfranchisement. There is no obvious answer as to who has the right to  deprive another human being of their basic human right to vote. History of Minority Exclusion from Voting The United States has a track record of excluding different groups of people fromContinue reading The Philosophical and Moral Implications of Felon Disenfranchisement

Regulatory Challenges to AI in Medicine

         Imagine you’re a cancer patient in 2050 sitting in a white leather recliner alongside a few other patients in a window-lit chemo room in a hospital somewhere. The scene seems familiar. You may have seen it in a movie or been there yourself. The sterile smell, awkward small-talk, and somehow bleak but simultaneously hopeful outlooksContinue reading “Regulatory Challenges to AI in Medicine”

Who Would Win in A Fight: Old Dead Plants or Rocks That Can Melt Your Organs? How Retired Coal Power Plants Could Hold the Key to Kentucky’s Future

The U.S. Department of Energy released a report this September that outlined how hundreds of coal power plants could be converted to nuclear power plants and cited the vast economic and environmental benefits that conversions would bring. The report looked at both retired and currently operating coal power plants across the U.S. and found 157Continue reading “Who Would Win in A Fight: Old Dead Plants or Rocks That Can Melt Your Organs? How Retired Coal Power Plants Could Hold the Key to Kentucky’s Future”

Behind Bars: The Economic Incentive to Incarcerate in Rural Kentucky

For decades in Kentucky and throughout the United States, it has been a commonly held notion that incarceration is predominantly an urban phenomenon. And up until recent years, Kentucky’s urban areas were indeed at the focal point of that phenomenon, incarcerating the largest proportions of their citizens. However, that pattern has altered today, and oddlyContinue reading Behind Bars: The Economic Incentive to Incarcerate in Rural Kentucky

Counterpoint: The Case Against Supreme Court Term Limits

As the new Supreme Court term dawns upon us, there have been serious questions raised about the legitimacy of the Court and what reforms need to be made. My friend and fellow Louisville Political Review writer wrote a compelling piece that asserts many points for reforming the Supreme Court. Some argue that Supreme Court termContinue reading “Counterpoint: The Case Against Supreme Court Term Limits”

A Left-Wing Approach to the Question of Universal Suffrage

Felons have long been barred from voting in the state of Kentucky. In 2019, Governor Andy Beshear signed an executive order to allow certain non-violent felons to vote. However, executive orders are not permanent and can be overturned by future governors. In Kentucky right now, 15% of Black people cannot vote, and 20% of BlackContinue reading “A Left-Wing Approach to the Question of Universal Suffrage”

Lies, Hatred, Murder, and Hope: My Response to a Civil Rights Immersion Experience

Introduction  The University of Louisville Martin Luther King Jr. Scholars Cohort of 2024, of which I am a part, recently went on a “Civil Rights Immersion Experience” throughout the South. We stopped in Memphis, Tennessee and Selma, Montgomery, and Birmingham, Alabama. We viewed a plethora of civil rights museums, historical sites, and memorials. It wasContinue reading Lies, Hatred, Murder, and Hope: My Response to a Civil Rights Immersion Experience

Should Supreme Court Justices Serve for Life?

The Supreme Court’s main objective is to make decisions in significant legal cases with constitutional implications. The Court has the final say, and as the other branches of government have increasingly come to a stalemate over issues, its significance and power have only increased. As a result, nominations have become crucial to long-term political agendasContinue reading “Should Supreme Court Justices Serve for Life?”