Here’s Why We Need To Get Rid of ShotSpotter

On a cold March night in 2021, the ShotSpotter gunshot detection system picked up the sounds of gunshots in a Chicago neighborhood, dispatching police to a dimly lit alleyway. What followed was a chase that quickly turned deadly. On that night, Adam Toledo was shot dead by those responding police. The incident, captured on video,Continue reading “Here’s Why We Need To Get Rid of ShotSpotter”

The Western Branch Library: a Beacon of Hope for Louisville’s Black Community

“The library does more than furnish facts and circulate books…the people feel that the library belongs to them, and that it may be used for anything that makes for their welfare.”  -Rev. Thomas Fountain Blue, the Western Branch’s first librarian For centuries, libraries have served as a space for self-enlightenment, a place where people canContinue reading “The Western Branch Library: a Beacon of Hope for Louisville’s Black Community”

A Louisville Story: A Short Essay on Shelby Lanier

While many of us may not typically consider a police officer to be a presence in a community beyond our day-to-day jobs, there are some that stick out. It’s partially a result of a police force that has become more focused on drug busts and bringing down crime statistics than on building relationships with communities.Continue reading “A Louisville Story: A Short Essay on Shelby Lanier”

The Everlasting Impact of Muhammad Ali

For Black History Month, the Louisville Political Review celebrates black stories and heroes. Today, we celebrate Louisville’s hero, the Great Muhammad Ali. The Red Bike That Changed History Ali was born in Louisville, Kentucky as Cassius Clay (former name until 1964) on January 17th of 1942 in a legally segregated country, in which black peopleContinue reading “The Everlasting Impact of Muhammad Ali”

Segregation and Racism in Jefferson County Public Schools

Prior to 1975, public schools in Louisville, Kentucky were separated into two districts: the Louisville school system and the Jefferson County school system. After the Supreme Court decision in Milliken v. Bradley in 1974, the Kentucky Board of Education merged the two districts into one, naming it the Jefferson County Public Schools System. The JeffersonContinue reading “Segregation and Racism in Jefferson County Public Schools”

Red Cross Hospital: Perseverance in the Bleak Face of Segregation

Few things mar the history of American cities as severely as the Jim Crow era of racial segregation and discrimination–and Louisville is no exception. Among many other injustices, Black people living in Jim Crow Louisville were overtly discriminated against even in health care.  In 1899, only two hospitals in Louisville would treat Black patients: LouisvilleContinue reading “Red Cross Hospital: Perseverance in the Bleak Face of Segregation”

The Practical Wisdom of Nonviolence in Black Activism

When a young Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. was surprisingly voted spokesperson of the Montgomery Bus Boycott, there was no way he could have foreseen the immeasurable impact his actions would have not only in Montgomery, but across the South, the nation, and the world. The boycott was the first organized mass demonstration of whatContinue reading “The Practical Wisdom of Nonviolence in Black Activism”

A Heart-Ache of a Process: Immigration in the United States

The United Nations defines a refugee as someone who has been forced to leave their country because they are facing persecution or some form of targeted violence. Typically, refugees do not live with the general public of their new country. Most live in refugee camps, as my family did. We lived in a refugee campContinue reading “A Heart-Ache of a Process: Immigration in the United States”

Louisville Needs Affordable Housing

It’s fall now, and the days have turned colder. At night it dips into the 40s, and like most people, I don’t have to compete for a safe spot to sleep, I don’t have to worry about staying warm and dry, about my belongings getting stolen in the middle of the night, or about gettingContinue reading “Louisville Needs Affordable Housing”

How Racism is Built into Louisville’s Infrastructure

Cities have the capability of providing something for everybody, only because, and only when, they are created by everybody. – Jane Jacobs, The Death and Life of Great American Cities (1961) The true dynamism of American cities comes from the connectedness of its institutions and the people within it. Considered one of the most residentiallyContinue reading “How Racism is Built into Louisville’s Infrastructure”