The Everlasting Impact of Muhammad Ali

For Black History Month, the Louisville Political Review celebrates black stories and heroes. Today, we celebrate Louisville’s hero, the Great Muhammad Ali. The Red Bike That Changed History Ali was born in Louisville, Kentucky as Cassius Clay (former name until 1964) on January 17th of 1942 in a legally segregated country, in which black peopleContinue reading “The Everlasting Impact of Muhammad Ali”

Voting Rights Are a Major Issue in Kentucky

The right to vote is currently under attack from all angles. The Supreme Court gutted the Voting Rights Act, state legislatures across the country are passing laws that will remove voting rights from many Black Americans, and trust in election processes and democracy are historically low. There is a strong national effort to strip BlackContinue reading “Voting Rights Are a Major Issue in Kentucky”

From Cotton to Congress: The Remarkable Rise and Careers of the First Black Congressmen

As a congressional intern with a passion for U.S. history and virtually unrestricted access to the entirety of the U.S. Capitol Building, I took every chance I could get to leave my office and explore. Unfortunate circumstances, both COVID-19 and the January 6th riot, left the great halls of Congress closed off to the publicContinue reading “From Cotton to Congress: The Remarkable Rise and Careers of the First Black Congressmen”

Segregation and Racism in Jefferson County Public Schools

Prior to 1975, public schools in Louisville, Kentucky were separated into two districts: the Louisville school system and the Jefferson County school system. After the Supreme Court decision in Milliken v. Bradley in 1974, the Kentucky Board of Education merged the two districts into one, naming it the Jefferson County Public Schools System. The JeffersonContinue reading “Segregation and Racism in Jefferson County Public Schools”

Red Cross Hospital: Perseverance in the Bleak Face of Segregation

Few things mar the history of American cities as severely as the Jim Crow era of racial segregation and discrimination–and Louisville is no exception. Among many other injustices, Black people living in Jim Crow Louisville were overtly discriminated against even in health care.  In 1899, only two hospitals in Louisville would treat Black patients: LouisvilleContinue reading “Red Cross Hospital: Perseverance in the Bleak Face of Segregation”

John Brown: A Biography

The institution of slavery will forever plague American history. The slave economy was a core feature of the growth of the financial system, culture, and politics of the country for almost two and a half centuries until it ultimately became a catalyst for civil war. Though the institution was dismantled, it molded into something hardlyContinue reading “John Brown: A Biography”

How Long Must We Be Here? A Lament

Why? Why does America refuse to learn from its history? Why have the purveyors of peace and freedom allowed–no, ensured–that a second class citizenry exists amidst the empty prosperity and freedom enjoyed by those former Europeans? Why has Black outcry gone ignored? Why have Black minds been neglected? When? When will America realize that itsContinue reading “How Long Must We Be Here? A Lament”

The Practical Wisdom of Nonviolence in Black Activism

When a young Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. was surprisingly voted spokesperson of the Montgomery Bus Boycott, there was no way he could have foreseen the immeasurable impact his actions would have not only in Montgomery, but across the South, the nation, and the world. The boycott was the first organized mass demonstration of whatContinue reading “The Practical Wisdom of Nonviolence in Black Activism”

The Direct Primary Care Model: Where You Can Get More for Less

Could patients ever pay less and get more? The question seems almost ridiculous in America now, where an ER visit can cost thousands of dollars, but a growing group of primary care physicians think the answer is yes. These primary care physicians use a business model called direct primary care. Think of it as aContinue reading “The Direct Primary Care Model: Where You Can Get More for Less”

An American Angst: What Keeps Young Voters From Traditional Political Participation?  

In May of 2016, a week after listening to former Democratic presidential candidate and Senator Bernie Sanders at a rally on the Great Lawn in Louisville, I walked down to my polling station to cast my first-ever vote in the Democratic primary election. A few weeks later, Senator Sanders would go on to lose theContinue reading “An American Angst: What Keeps Young Voters From Traditional Political Participation?  “